Skip to content
Auriga accounting
Auriga accounting
Edit Content
auriga accounting
CAN NON FARMER BE MEMBER OF A PRODUCER COMPANY?

CAN NON FARMER BE MEMBER OF A PRODUCER COMPANY?

Introduction

YOU NEED TO KNOW CAN NON FARMER BE MEMBER OF A PRODUCER COMPANY?

Yes, non-farmers be members of a Producer company under certain conditions. As per the Companies Act in India, a producer company can include individuals who are engaged in the production, marketing, or processing of agricultural products, as well as those providing technical services to farmers. Non-farmers can join as members if they contribute to the company’s objectives. This inclusive approach allows for a diverse range of individuals to participate in and support the activities of the producer company, fostering collaboration and enhancing the overall efficiency of agricultural operations. Visitofficialwebsite

The Legal Framework for Producer Companies

The legal framework for producer companies in India is primarily governed by the Companies Act, 2013. According to this act, a producer company is defined as a company that is registered under the provisions of the act, has the objective of production, procurement, and marketing of primary produce of its members or import or export of goods for their benefit.

The Companies Act, 2013, lays down certain conditions and provisions for producer companies, which include:

  1. Formation: Producer companies can be formed by ten or more individuals (or two or more institutions), each of whom is a producer.

  2. Membership: Membership is limited to primary producers. The definition of “primary producer” includes farmers engaged in agriculture, produce, animal husbandry, pisciculture, and any other primary produce. However, the act does not explicitly restrict membership to farmers alone.

  3. Ownership: A producer company’s ownership is limited to its members. This ensures that the benefits of the company are directly shared among its members.

  4. Management: The management of a producer company is typically in the hands of its members. The board of directors is elected by the members.

  5. Objective: The primary objective of a producer company is to promote the economic interests of its members. This includes activities such as production, harvesting, processing, procurement, grading, pooling, handling, marketing, and selling of the primary produce.

Given the legal framework and definitions, it is clear that producer companies are intended to serve the interests of primary producers, which often include farmers. However, the act doesn’t explicitly exclude non-farmers from becoming members of a producer company.

Non-Farmers as Members of Producer Companies

Now, let’s delve into the possibility of non-farmers becoming members of producer companies. While the focus of producer companies is on primary producers, including farmers, there are situations in which non-farmers may also join a producer company. This can be attributed to the inclusive nature of the Companies Act, 2013, and the diverse objectives of producer companies.

  1. Non-Farmers Engaged in Primary Produce: The act defines primary produce as not limited to agricultural produce but includes other primary produce as well. This broader definition means that individuals engaged in activities such as animal husbandry, pisciculture (fish farming), and other primary produce-related activities are eligible for membership. So, non-farmers involved in these activities can become members of a producer company.

  2. Diversification of Activities: Some producer companies may diversify their activities beyond traditional farming. For instance, a producer company might engage in food processing, agribusiness, or even non-agricultural activities like handloom, handicrafts, or any other primary produce-related trade. In such cases, non-farmers with expertise in these areas may find opportunities to join producer companies.

  3. Rural Development and Allied Activities: Producer companies can also undertake allied activities that contribute to rural development. These activities may include setting up rural infrastructure, providing access to education and healthcare, and more. In these cases, individuals with expertise in rural development or related fields, even if they are not traditional farmers, could potentially be members of such producer companies.

  4. Changing Dynamics: The rural landscape in India is evolving, with an increasing number of individuals engaged in activities related to primary produce but not necessarily traditional farming. The legal framework for producer companies allows for flexibility and adaptation to these changing dynamics.

It’s important to note that while non-farmers may become members of producer companies under certain circumstances, the central focus of these companies remains the welfare of primary producers. The law intends to ensure that the benefits generated by the producer company primarily accrue to its members, who are engaged in primary produce-related activities.

Benefits of Allowing Non-Farmers as Members

The inclusion of non-farmers as members of producer companies can have several potential benefits:

  1. Diversification: Producer companies can diversify their activities and business operations, making them more versatile and resilient. This diversification can lead to increased income and opportunities for both primary producers and non-farmers.

  2. Expertise and Skill: Non-farmers may bring specialized skills and expertise in areas like agribusiness, marketing, technology, and rural development, which can enhance the overall functioning of the producer company.

  3. Access to Capital: Non-farmers may also contribute to the capital and investment required for the producer company’s growth and development, which can benefit all members.

  4. Market Access: With non-farmers on board, producer companies can potentially access wider markets, explore export opportunities, and develop innovative products and services.

  5. Economic Growth: The inclusion of non-farmers can contribute to the economic growth of the region where the producer company operates, leading to better living standards for the entire community.

Is a producer a farmer

This means that as farms grow into bigger and bigger businesses, the ones who own and operate them are more likely to be managers and marketers and accountants and less likely to be actual farmers. In other words, they move along the continuum from “farmer” to “food producer.”

What are the rules for producer companies

A Producer Company is formed by a minimum of 10 individuals or two or more institutions, with at least 5 directors, and it is a separate legal entity. Members of the Producer Company have limited liability, and the liability of the company is limited to the extent of its assets.

Who can be a member of farmer producer company

A Farmer Producer Company (FPC) can be formed by any 10 or more primary producers or by two or more producer institutions, or by a contribution of both. An FPC is a hybrid between cooperative societies and private limited companies.

What is the difference between a farmer and a producer

A farmer is someone who owns or works on a farm, earning an income from coffee. They have a deep understanding of coffee production passed down through previous generations. A producer may not necessarily own any coffee trees, but instead may purchase coffee from local farmers or from the market.

Can a private company be converted into producer company

Shareholder Approval: Obtain the consent of shareholders through a special resolution for the conversion. c. Altering the Memorandum and Articles of Association: Amend the Memorandum and Articles of Association to align with the objectives and structure of a Producer Company.

Can producer company be a small company

Minimum number of producers required to form a PC is 10 while there is no limit for maximum number of members and the membership can be increased as per feasibility and need. This helps even 10 individuals start a Producer Company which is easy.

Is GST applicable for farmer producer company

Farmers Do Not Need GST Registration

Further, the farmer must also cultivate the land by his labour, by the labour of his/her family or through hired labour under personal supervision. Thus, the compliance to file GST shall apply to any company, LLP or Corporation involved in the farming or agricultural activities

What is a farmer producer organization? What are its aspects? What is its potential

The farmer producer organization is a legal entity formed by a group of farmers. The basic motive behind the formation of the farmer producer organization is the reaping the benefit of the power of aggregation. It may be related to agriculture, handicraft, dairy and fishing.

1- The farmer producer organization is the combination of the spirit of cooperation and professionalism of the private organization.

2- Each member vote is counted in any decision. It is a member-driven organization.

3- The benefit of the member is one of the prime motives of the FPO.

The major task of rural development can be achieved through these FPO’s.

Promotion of contract farming

In India, 86% of the farmers are under the category of small and marginal farmers. These farmers do not have the bargaining ability to proceed with contract farming with this big organization. Hence the formation of the FPO can promote the culture the contract farming among the small and marginal farmers which will enhance their income.

Credit facility to the farmers

The members of this organization get low-cost credit which can be used for daily operations.

Input facilities for farmers

These organizations can open agriculture input stores which will further help to increase the income of the farmers.

What organizations give aid to farmers

There are many organizations that give aid to farmers, including:

  1. International organizations: The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Food Programme (WFP) provide assistance to farmers in developing countries through programs aimed at increasing food security, improving agricultural productivity, and reducing poverty.
 

2. National and regional organizations: Many countries have national and regional organizations that provide assistance to farmers, including agricultural extension services, research institutions, and farmer organizations.

 

3. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs): NGOs such as Oxfam, ActionAid, and Heifer International work to improve the lives of farmers in developing countries through programs focused on food security, agricultural development, and community empowerment.

 

4. Private foundations: Private foundations, such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Ford Foundation, provide funding for agricultural research and development, as well as programs aimed at improving the lives of farmers and communities in developing countries.

 

5. Corporate foundations: Some large corporations, such as Walmart and Cargill, have established foundations to support programs that improve food security and agricultural development.

 

6. Governments: Many governments provide financial and technical assistance to farmers through programs aimed at improving agricultural productivity and reducing poverty.

 

These organizations work to support farmers in a variety of ways, including providing training, access to finance, and access to markets. By working together, these organizations can help to improve the lives of farmers, increase food security, and contribute to sustainable economic development.

NON FARMER BE MEMBER OF A PRODUCER COMPANY

Challenges and Considerations

While there are potential benefits to allowing non-farmers as members of producer companies, there are also challenges and considerations to be mindful of:

  1. Primary Producer Interests: The primary focus of producer companies is the welfare of primary producers. There’s a risk that the interests of non-farmers may at times diverge from those of primary producers. Striking a balance between these interests can be challenging.

  2. Membership Criteria: Producer companies should establish clear membership criteria that ensure that non-farmers joining the company are indeed engaged in activities related to primary produce. This is to prevent opportunistic memberships that might dilute the company’s core objectives.

  3. Governance and Control: Non-farmers joining a producer company should not dominate its governance and control. The act specifies that the board of directors should primarily consist of members from among the primary producers. Striking the right balance in board representation is crucial.

  4. Conflicts of Interest: Producer companies must establish mechanisms to address conflicts of interest, particularly when non-farmer members have business interests that could conflict with the interests of primary producers.

  5. Educating and Sensitizing Members: Both farmers and non-farmers must be educated about the company’s objectives, values, and the importance of working together for the collective benefit. Sensitization programs can help create a cohesive membership.

How auriga accounting help you to define non farmer to be member of a producer company

  1. Membership Record Keeping: Auriga Accounting software can be used to maintain detailed records of the members of the producer company. This includes personal details, contact information, and their involvement in primary produce-related activities. This data can help the company track the eligibility of members, including non-farmers.

  2. Customized Member Categories: Auriga Accounting allow for the creation of customized categories or tags for members. Producer companies can use this feature to categorize members into various groups, such as farmers and non-farmers. This categorization can help in defining eligibility and assessing the composition of the company’s membership.

  3. Business Activity Tracking: Auriga Accounting often includes modules for tracking business activities. For producer companies, this can involve tracking primary produce-related activities and other allied activities. Non-farmers involved in primary produce-related endeavors can be monitored and managed through this system.

  4. Member Communications: Effective communication with members is crucial in producer companies. Auriga Accounting software can facilitate sending notifications and updates to members, which can include reminders of eligibility criteria, membership terms, and any changes in the company’s policies regarding non-farmer members.

  5. Financial Compliance: Producer companies must adhere to various financial and compliance requirements. Auriga Accounting ensures that the company’s financial records are accurate and that all financial activities, including contributions from non-farmer members, are properly accounted for.

  6. Audit Trail: Accounting software maintains an audit trail of all financial transactions and activities. This transparency can help ensure that any benefits or profits derived from the company are distributed to the eligible members, be they farmers or non-farmers.

  7. Data Analytics: Auriga Accounting often includes data analytics capabilities. This can help producer companies analyze the composition of their membership, track the impact of non-farmers on the company’s performance, and assess whether the inclusion of non-farmers is aligning with the company’s objectives.

  8. Reporting and Compliance Checks: Auriga Accounting provide customizable reporting features. Producer companies can create reports that specifically focus on membership eligibility, compliance with legal provisions, and governance related to non-farmer members.

  9. Automation of Regulatory Compliance: Some accounting software solutions offer features for automating regulatory compliance. This can be useful for ensuring that the company abides by any legal requirements related to non-farmer membership.

  10. Cost and Revenue Allocation: For producer companies with a mix of farmers and non-farmers, cost and revenue allocation can be complex. Accounting software can automate this process, ensuring that benefits are distributed in a fair and transparent manner.

It’s important to note that while accounting software like Auriga Accounting can assist in the management and record-keeping aspects of producer companies, they do not define the eligibility criteria for membership. This is determined by the legal framework and the company’s own bylaws and policies.

February 21, 2024

new

RELATED ARTICLES

CAN PRODUCER COMPANY RECEIVED GOVERNMENT GRANT AND SUBSIDY?
CAN PRODUCER COMPANY RECEIVED GOVERNMENT GRANT AND SUBSIDY? NO.1 GUIDE
CAN PRODUCER...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
HOW DOES A PRODUCER COMPANY CONTRIBUTE TO RURAL DEVELOPMENT? JUST 5 STEPS
HOW DOES A...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
CAN PRODUCER COMPANY INGAGE IN EXPORT AND IMPORT ACTIVITIES? IN JUST 5 STEPS
CAN PRODUCER...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PRODUCER COMPANY IN EMPOWERING FARMERS AND PRODUCER? NO.1 GUIDE
WHAT IS THE...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
CAN A PRODUCER COMPANY BE WOUND UP? IN JUST 5 STEPS
CAN A PRODUCER...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
IS THERE A REQUIREMENT FOR AUDIT IN PRODUCER COMPANY? IN JUST 5 STEPS
IS THERE A...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
CAN A PRODUCER COMPANY CHANGE ITS REGISTER OFFICE ADDRESS? IN 5 STEPS
CAN A PRODUCER...
placeholder AURIGA ACCOUNTING PRIVATE LIMITED
WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENT OF ANNUAL FILING BY PRODUCER COMPANY? NO.1 GUIDE
WHAT ARE THE...
CAN FOREIGN NATIONAL INVEST PRODUCER COMPANY?
CAN FOREIGN NATIONAL INVEST PRODUCER COMPANY? nO.1 GUIDE
CAN FOREIGN...